Book Report: Pathologies of Power

I read it so you don’t have to.

Pathologies of Power outlines what Partners In Health means when it talks about striving to create a “preferential option for the poor in healthcare.”
For many years, PIH shared Pathologies of Power Chapter 5 with new employees as it calls upon public health practitioners to be community-based, patient-centered and open towards others: to “observe, judge, act.”
Dr. Farmer borrows the social justice framework from liberation theology to emphasize our collective responsibility to fight alongside community partners for liberation from social, political, and economic oppression/structural violence.
What do you think of this approach?
Is it still relevant?
Is it problematic to use this framing? 

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